Bibliography

General Preparatory Readings

Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, On Historicizing Epistemology. An Essay. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010.

Anthony Kenny, A New History of Western Philosophy. Vol. 1: Ancient Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.

  • Chapter 5: How Things Happen: Physics, 178-198
  • Chapter 6: What There Is: Metaphysics, 198-228.

Anthony Kenny, A New History of Western Philosophy. Vol. 2: Medieval Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.

  • Chapter 2: The Schoolmen: From the Twelfth Century to the Renaissance, 54-114.

Alexander Jones and Liba Chaia Taub (eds.), The Cambridge History of Science. Volume 1: Ancient Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.

  • Introduction, 1-4
  • 1 chapter chosen by the participant following her/his research interests.

David C. Lindberg and Michael H. Shank (eds.), The Cambridge History of Science. Volume 2: Medieval Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

  • Introduction, 1-26
  • 1 chapter chosen by the participant following her/his research interests.

Suggested Readings (one per session)

ROBERT MIDDEKE-CONLIN (MPIWG Berlin)
Ancient Chemistry: The aromatics industries of the Old Babylonian period.

Suggested reading: Robert Middeke-Conlin, “The Scents of Larsa: A Study of the Aromatics Industry in an Old Babylonian Kingdom.” Cuneiform Digital Library Journal 1 (2014): http://www.cdli.ucla.edu/pubs/cdlj/2014/cdlj2014_001.html


VINCENZO CARLOTTA (HU Berlin)
Universal Nature and Individual Metallic Natures in Byzantine Alchemy.

Suggested reading: Matteo Martelli, “Greek Alchemists at Work: ‘Alchemical Laboratory’ in the Greco-Roman Egypt.” Nuncius 26 (2011): 271-311.


ANNE GRONS (FU Berlin)
On Minerals and Stones as Ingredients of Coptic Pharmacological Prescriptions.

Suggested reading: T. S. Richter, “Toward a Sociohistorical Approach to the Corpus of Coptic Medical Texts.” In: M. F. Ayad (ed.) Studies in Coptic Culture. Transmission and Interaction. Cairo – New York, 2016, pp. 33-54.


CESARE PASTORINO (TU Berlin)
Studying the Formation of Fossils in the Early Modern Period.

Suggested reading:  Martin Rudwick, (1976 2nd ed.), The Meaning of Fossils: Episodes in the History of Palaeontology. New York, 1976. Chapter 1: “Fossil Objects” (pp. 1-48).


GIOULI KOROBILI (HU Berlin)
Botany and Entomology in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

Suggested reading: Gavin Hardy and Laurence Totelin (eds.), Ancient Botany. London-New York, 2016. Introduction (pp.6-32); Chapter 1 (pp. 33-62).


NICHOLAS AUBIN (HU Berlin)
A tenth-century Islamic Neoplatonist on the Nobility of the Date Palm.

Suggested readings: Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila, The Last Pagans of Iraq: Ibn Waḥshiyya and his Nabatean Agriculture. Leiden, 2006. Chapter 1, sections 1 through 4 (pp. 3-51). And Monica Gagliano, Thus Spoke the Plant. Berkeley, 2018. Chapter N (pp. 55-71).


MARIA AVXENTEVSKAYA (MPIWG Berlin)
Rooting of Plants vs. Rooting of Words: Structuring Living Nature through Early Modern Artificial Languages.

Suggested reading: Rhodri Lewis, Language, Mind and Nature. Cambridge, 2007. Chapter 4 “Discursus: Artificial languages, religion, and the occult” (pp. 110-145).


GRÉGORY CLESSE (Köln)
Animals with Human Skills: Translating and Commenting Aristotle in the Middle Ages.

Suggested reading: Aafke van Oppenraaij, “Avicenna’s Liber de animalibus (‘Abbreviatio Avicennae’). Preliminaries and State of Affairs.” Documenti e studi sulla tradizione filosofica medievale 28 (2017): 401-416.


MATTIA CIPRIANI (FU Berlin)
Animals in 13th Century Latin Encyclopaedias: classification, auctoritates and direct observation.

Suggested reading: Lynn Thorndike, A History of Magic and Experimental Science. New York, 1923. Vol. II, pp. 305-306 and 372-435.


EMMANUELLE KUHRY (Orleans-IRHT)
The Physiologus and its medieval heritage: from Christian moralised bestiary to natural philosophy source.

Suggested reading: Florence MacCulloch, Medieval Latin and French bestiaries. Chapel Hill, 1962. Chapter 1 (pp. 15-20); Chapter 2 (pp. 21-44); Chapter 3 (pp. 45-69).


KATJA KRAUSE (MPIWG Berlin)
Conceptualising Experience in the Medieval Sciences of Animals.

Suggested reading: Katharine Park, “Observation in the Margins, 500-1500.” In Lorraine Daston and Elizabeth Lunbeck (eds.), Histories of Observation. Chicago, 2011, pp. 15–44.


NICOLA POLLONI (HU Berlin)
Premodern Epistemologies of Matter.

Suggested reading: Richard Sorabji, “Analyses of Matter, Ancient and Modern.” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 86/1 (1986): 1-22.


ANGELA AXWORTHY (MPIWG Berlin)
The Geometrisation of the Heavens in Pre- and Early Modern Europe.

Suggested reading: E.J. Aiton, “Celestial spheres and circles”. History of Science 19 (1981): 75-114.


TOM LANCASTER (Durham)
Physical matter: from the large scale structure of spacetime to the quantum structure of elementary particles.

Suggested reading: R.B. Laughlin and D. Pines “The theory of everything.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97/1 (2000): 28-31.


ROSIE REED GOLD (London) and JOSHUA HARVEY (Oxford)
How to see nothing; an exploration of absence in art and its parallels to the epistemological pursuit of prime matter.

Suggested readings: John Cage, Silence. Hanover, 1961. “III: Communication”, pp. 41-57; and Wolfgang Ernst, The Delayed Present: Media-Induced Tempor(e)alities and Techo-Traumatic Irritations of “the Contemporary”. Berlin, 2017. “I: Temporalizing the Present (Differential Delay)”, pp. 11-21.